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UTS6H Panel with attached Back-UPS Pro 1500/BR24BPG External Battery Pack and standby eu3000is Generator

Discussion in Universal Transfer Switch started by Robert , 8/21/2014 5:59 PM
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UTS6H Panel with attached Back-UPS Pro 1500/BR24BPG External Battery Pack and standby eu3000is Generator

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  • rwmann

    About a year ago, I had installed and I setup a UTS6H Panel with attached Back-UPS Pro 1500/BR24BPG External Battery Pack (on Circuit 1 as indicated in the setup guide) and had installed a hard-wired external inlet for a standby eu3000is Generator.

    I consistently have "six green" on the UTS panel and the UPS and eternal battery self-test fine.

    That said, I have noticed that during brief (sub-second) power outages, the "uninterruptible" circuits designed to be powered by the Back-UPS Pro 1500 drop, and are powered by local Smart-UPS units in the remote office.

    In a recent test, I removed power from UTS6H circuits 5 and 6, and the UTS panel went dark. The Back-UPS 1500 with external battery pack did not kick in to power the panel or any of the "uninterruptible" circuits.

    What am I doing wrong here?  I am expecting the "uninterruptible" designated circuits and the UTS6H to be powered through a power event transient (and based on load and capacity, for up to 20 minutes, long enough to drag out and start up the eu3000is) by the Back-UPS 1500 and BR24BPG, and that doesn't appear to be happening.

    Thanks.

  • Techsplosion

    Which circuits to you have set as "uninterruptible", and what load is on those circuits? Also, do you have these circuits setup as "Delayable"? Delayable circuits will use ALM (adaptive load management) which is a type of load shedding, shutting down less important circuits to save runtime for the important ones. With that being said, if you're not using ALM it would be best to go into System Setup and turn load shedding off. Something else to check in the System Setup menu is "Backup2 Source type", and make sure it's set to "UPS".

    It's also possible that the total load across the uninterupptible circuits exceeds the total capacity of the UPS, which would force the UTS to bypass the UPS. You can set the logic in the UTS for the size of the UPS in the System Setup menu. The user manual also explains what each particular setting in the System Setup menu means - you can find it here: http://www.apc.com/products/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=uts10bi&tab=documentation (the section you need starts on page 7)

    To answer your other question, the UTS6H is actually a 240v device. It needs 240v across circuits 5 and 6 (supplied from either utility or a generator) in order to keep itself on, which is why the entire unit shut down when power was removed from them. Since the BackUPS is a 120v UPS, it can't keep the UTS powered on by itself.

  • rwmann

    With respect, per the manual, the UTS6H is a "120V only" device. It senses different 120V phases on circuits 5 and 6 to detect mains power failure.  It cannot handle 240V and thus the 120V Back-UPS 1500 and eu300is are appropriate for the intended purpose.

    One area that does create some confusion is in the designation of Setup Option 2 backup sources and the distinction between "UNINTERRUPTIBLE" and "UPS":

    "Setup Option 2-Source

    The factory default setting for the backup power source is GEN (generator). Use the down/up arrow keys to establish the

    backup power source for a selected circuit.

    GEN-backup power source will be a connected generator.

    UNINTERRUPTIBLE-there is continuous backup power supplied by a UPS. Utility power flows into the UPS and from

    the UPS to the connected load. This provides power and protection for the load during any utility power fluctuation.

    NONE-there will be no backup power source available.

    EITHER-backup power source will be either a connected generator or a UPS.

    UPS-backup power source will be a connected UPS.

    Note: Backup power source availability varies for some circuits.

    The UPS and EITHER backup power source options are not available for:

    • circuit1 on all units

    • the designated 240 V circuits on the UTS6BI or the UTS10BI"

  • Techsplosion

    True, the UTS6H only has dedicated 120v output circuits (unlike the UTS10BI for example, that uses circuits 9 and 10 to form a dedicated 240v circuit). However, the UTS6H does need two opposite phases of 120v (measuring 240v total) across 5 and 6 to function. Page 10 of the installation manual explains: UTS6/UTS6H - Utilizing all of the UTS circuits is not necessary.However, Circuits 5 and 6 must be connected to the building circuit panel and must receive power for the UTS to function. Circuits 5 and 6 must be connected to circuits that are in opposite phases so that 240 Vac is present across the circuits 5 and 6.


    The setup section you were referring to is a little confusing. If the circuit is set to "uninterruptible", then whatever load is on that circuit will actually be powered normally by the UPS. So the normal state of operation will have the circuit(s) being protected by the UPS, just like they were plugged into the back of the UPS itself. Selecting "UPS" as a backup source would mean those circuits are powered only by the UPS during an outage, not by the connected generator.



  • rwmann

    And the issue is that on circuits set to "uninterruptible", I am not seeing the UPS power those when line power fails, despite those circuit loads being less than half the UPS continuous 875W capacity.

  • rwmann

    "UTS6H is actually a 240v device. It needs 240v across circuits 5 and 6 (supplied from either utility or a generator) in order to keep itself on, which is why the entire unit shut down when power was removed from them. Since the BackUPS is a 120v UPS, it can't keep the UTS powered on by itself."

    If this were true, then the APC UTS6H and APC Back-UPS and single-phase 120V Honda generators (such as eu3000is) that are specified for use are incompatible by design.

  • wayne_i

    My first thought was that your "remote" UPS was not accepting the "quality" of the modified sine wave from the Back-UPS Pro 1500, and switching over to battery, which may still be a sensitivity problem... On further thought, if the UTS is going dark when you disable utility input power on circuits 5 and 6, it sounds like the Back-UPS Pro 1500 is NOT actually powering the UTS.

    Have you confirmed that the "Utility" AND "UPS" LEDs are illuminated when the UTS is operating on utility power? If not, then the UPS is not recognized by the UTS as providing power. If the UPS LED IS illuminated when utility power is good, does the Back-UPS Pro 1500 shutdown when you kill circuits 5 and 6? If the Back-UPS Pro 1500 is shutting down then it sounds like an overload situation. Remember the UPS will be powering ALL circuits set to "Uninterruptible" on the UTS.

    By the way, a transfer switch that can only operate with good utility power wouldn't be a very useful transfer switch!

  • rwmann

    "Have you confirmed that the "Utility" AND "UPS" LEDs are illuminated when the UTS is operating on utility power?"

    Yes, both green

    "If the UPS LED IS illuminated when utility power is good, does the Back-UPS Pro 1500 shutdown when you kill circuits 5 and 6?"

    No, the Back-UPS Pro 1500 and accessory battery pack do not shut down.

    "By the way, a transfer switch that can only operate with good utility power wouldn't be a very useful transfer switch!"

    No kidding!  Which is why I'm trying to sort this out before it's needed in anger.